http://xml.sandn.net/images/feedlogo.JPGGenealogy News, Information and Updateshttp://xml.sandn.netGenealogy News, Information and UpdatesRegularly updated genealogy information in the UK. Includes general information and news, information about online information, updates from family history websites, reviews of genealogy products, and more.http://xml.sandn.neten-gbCopyright (c) British Data Archive48article.php?id=48Regimental Standards and Cap BadgesWithin the regimental system, soldiers and officers are posted to a tactical unit of their own regiment whenever posted to field duty.
Within the regimental system, soldiers and officers are posted to a tactical unit of their own regiment whenever posted to field duty. A regiment is likely to include: - a symbolic colonel-in-chief (often a member of the royal family), - a Colonel of the Regiment or "honorary colonel" who protects the traditions and interests of the regimental family and insists on the maintenance of high standards, - battle honours (honours earned by one unit of an administrative regiment are shared by the whole regiment), - ceremonial uniforms, - cap badges, - and regimental marches and songs. More information about regimental standards and cap badges can be found at ArmyLists.org.uk
12 Mar 2007http://www.armylists.org.uk
84article.php?id=84Website solves mystery of ancestor missing for decadesJohn Titford finds the marriage of a ancestor he had been looking for for over twenty years.
I had been looking for the marriage of a ancestor of mine for over twenty years. Thomas Hasted, a cloth scourer of Fenchurch Street and a freeman of the Clothworkers' Company, would have married a lady with the first name of Mary some time in the late 1730s. I must say that I had always thought that he must have gone in for a Fleet wedding, but I lacked both the courage and the time to wade through the voluminous original registers at the National Archives. Yet there he was on the new web-site, identifiable in a flash: Thomas Hasted, bachelor, `scourer' of St Catherine Cree Church (in Leadenhall Street) and Mary Stevenson. spinster, were married at the `Shepherd and Goat' on Fleet Ditch by John Gaynham, the so-called `Bishop of Hell', who entered the details in his grubby little notebook. The marriage took place in 1737. Now Thomas Hasted had begun an apprenticeship in 1733, and apprentices were not allowed to marry during their term. Thomas was not made free of the Clothworkers' Company until 1740, and - like many others with something to hide - he had married secretly, no questions asked, during his apprenticeship. Success, then, after twenty years of fruitless searching. - John Titford The above is an extract from the letters page of Family Tree Magazine Fleet marriages are just one of the unique sets of BMD records going back the the 17th century available on www.TheGenealogist.co.uk and www.BMDRegsiters.co.uk.
19 Jun 2009http://www.bmdregisters.co.uk
47article.php?id=47Military Head DressHeadwear is one of the defining items of military clothing. The colour signifies which part of the army a soldier belongs to, and the headwear carries the Corps or Regimental badge.
Headwear is one of the defining items of military clothing. The colour signifies which part of the army a soldier belongs to, and the headwear carries the Corps or Regimental badge. Military Head Dress includes, but is not limited to: Busby - a military head-dress made of fur, worn by Hungarian hussars. Shako - a tall, cylindrical military cap, usually peaked, sometimes tapered at the top. It is usually adorned with some kind of ornamental plate or badge on the front, metallic or otherwise, and often has a feather, plume, or pompon attached at the top. Bearskins - a tall fur cap worn as part of the ceremonial uniform of several regiments in the British Army (most notably the five regiments of Foot Guards). More information about military head dress available from ArmyLists.org.uk.
12 Mar 2007http://www.armylists.org.uk
31article.php?id=31The Census - What information can I find in each year?A census was taken every 10 years from 1810, but were only useful to genealogists as of 1841.
A census was taken every 10 years from 1810 but, the census taken between 1810 and 1831 were of little use to genealogists since they recorded only the numbers in each household. From 1841 the census is of use. The census was taken from midnight on Sunday/Monday as follows: 1841 Census - 6 & 7th June 1851 Census - 30 & 31st March 1861 Census - 7 & 8th April 1871 Census - 2 & 3rd April 1881 Census - 3 & 4th April 1891 Census - 5 & 6th April 1901 Census - 31st March & 1st April 1911 Census - 2nd & 3rd April Details recorded in the 1841 Census: - Address (vague) - Names - Age: (a) 15 and under exact age, (b) over 15 recorded to the lowest 5 years e.g. someone age 56, 57, 58 or 59 would be recorded as 55. - Occupation of each individual - Whether born in this country - recorded as Yes/Y or country of birth Details recorded in the 1851 - 1901 Census: - Road, street, number or name of house - Whether the house is inhabited or not - Name and surname of each person - Relationship to head of house - Married/Unmarried - Age last birthday - Profession - Whether employed or not - Place of birth - Whether blind/insane/feeble minded - Details about whether the house was being built (1901 Census ONLY) - If the individual was working at home (1901 Census ONLY) Details recorded in the 1911 Census: - Forename & Surname - Age - Sex - Occupation - Address - Town/county of birth - Relation to head of household - Marital status - Medical disabilities - Employment status - Nationality - Duration of current marriage - Number of children born within that marriage - Number of living children - Number of any children who have died It is possible to obtain more recent information from the census. You will need to provide the exact address and name, give your reason for requiring the information, prove you're a descendant and if anyone on the record is still alive, get their permission to obtain the data.
6 Mar 2007http://www.ukcensusonline.com