http://xml.sandn.net/images/feedlogo.JPGGenealogy News, Information and Updateshttp://xml.sandn.netGenealogy News, Information and UpdatesRegularly updated genealogy information in the UK. Includes general information and news, information about online information, updates from family history websites, reviews of genealogy products, and more.http://xml.sandn.neten-gbCopyright (c) British Data Archive5article.php?id=5Knebworth House, the 'stately home of rock' in the 1851 CensusThe 1851 Census includes the records for Knebworth House, the 'stately home of rock', which has welcomed acts such as Pink Floyd, The Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin and Queen.
The 1851 Census for Hitchin, Hertfordshire (HO107/1709-1710) includes the records for Knebworth House, the 'stately home of rock', which has welcomed acts such as Pink Floyd, The Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin and Queen. The Lytton family have owned Knebworth House, which began life as a red brick tudor manor house, since 1490. The house was greatly altered by its most famous resident, Edward Bulwer-Lytton, who added a heavy gothic element to the building. Edward, who because an MP in 1831, was also a popular writer of his day, publishing novels such as Pelham, Godolphin, and The Last Days of Pompeii. He also had a talent for coining a memorable phrase, notably 'the pen is mightier than the sword' and 'in pursuit of the almighty dollar'. Edward succeeded to Knebworth in 1843, and often invited illustrious friends from literary and parliamentary circles to stay there, including Charles Dickens. If you take a look at the 1851 Census for Hertfordshire, you can find E Bulwer Lytton listed as a baronet and proprietor of land employing 25 labourers. (HO107/1709, folio 302). Census sets are available on CD from British Data Archive.
13 Dec 2006http://www.britishdataarchive.com
1article.php?id=1London AncestorsAs anyone with ancestors in the London area knows, research there can be a nightmare. There are different records offices for the City of London, Westminster, and Greater London. So what's the best way to do your research?
As anyone with ancestors in the London area knows, research there can be a nightmare. There are different records offices for the City of London, Westminster, Greater London, parishes in the pre-1888 counties of Surrey and Kent, as well as a multitude of local history libraries. If a family moved only a few streets, it can mean decamping from one repository to another to track them. This is time-consuming enough for Londoners but for those elsewhere the time and travel expenses are multiplied. Two of S&N's publications go some way to overcoming the obstacles for those working on the mid-nineteenth century, when people were flooding into London from all over the country. The London 1852 Directory can help to pinpoint where an ancestor lived because it would have been compiled in the census year. The set of two CD-ROMs making up the London 1851 Census should locate him or her in this important census, the first to require place of birth. The 31 discs include a street index. The whole of the 1851 census for London, digitised from microfiche and supplemented where necessary from the original books, is included. As there is no complete index, S&N are encouraging people to help produce one by including an Excel spreadsheet in this pack and showing which areas have been already done on their website. S&N also have a CD-ROM containing the 1851 index at its current state, which can be accessed for the same price at TheGenealogist. Some areas have been indexed and are available from the volunteers that created them, usually local family history societies. Even if your ancestors were not skilled enough to be included in the Directory or you don't know exactly which street they lived in, clicking through a district of the census at home is certainly preferable to traveling to the FRC to use the microfilms. It will also probably be cheaper than making several trips to London if you live outside.
24 Nov 2006http://www.genealogysupplies.com/
2article.php?id=2Military History - A wealth of resources to help trace a military anceThose inspired by November's Remembrance Day events to research their military forebears have a wealth of information available to help them.
Those inspired by November's Remembrance Day events to research their military forebears have a wealth of information available to help them. A good starter is the Second World War Army, Navy, R.A.F. and Indian Services Staff Deaths CD, which contains the name, rank, service number or rating, unit or branch and year of birth of the men and women who died during the war. It does not include service details, but there are references to original documents, where available, to enable further research. The volumes of the National Roll Of The Great War list, by geographic area, some of the men and women who fought in the First World War, including both casualties and those who survived. Each individual's service is briefly summarised, carefully distinguishing between those who 'volunteered' and those who 'joined', as a result of conscription. Home addresses are included. It's a mine of information for the family historian, giving many leads to follow up. Men and women who did war work in factories are also covered so a complete picture of an entire family's service can be reconstructed. The Great War, which was an early part-work, was published during the War. Illustrated with photographs and maps, it recounts the progress of the war, enabling the family historian to understand the political and military tactics of the time. The patriotic tone and emphasis on the enemies' shortcomings while minimising Allied errors is understandable, given the date of writing. What is particularly welcome, however, is the scope. Today, most people think only of battles in France and Belgium but events in all the many countries caught up in the conflict are examined. It was truly the first war to involve much of the world.
1 Dec 2006http://www.armylists.org.uk/
17article.php?id=17Cambridgeshire, Norfolk and Suffolk 1858 Post Office DirectoryCovering towns, villages and parishes of these three counties comprehensively.
The Cambridgeshire, Norfolk and Suffolk 1858 Post Office Directory covers the towns, villages and parishes of these three counties comprehensively. A short description of each place is followed by an alphabetical list of private residents and businesses. Other snippets include details of carrier services, schools and post offices and court directories. The CD, published by S&N Genealogy Supplies, is fully searchable and includes three county maps plus illustrated advertisements.
1 Feb 2007http://www.genealogyreviews.co.uk