http://xml.sandn.net/images/feedlogo.JPGGenealogy News, Information and Updateshttp://xml.sandn.netGenealogy News, Information and UpdatesRegularly updated genealogy information in the UK. Includes general information and news, information about online information, updates from family history websites, reviews of genealogy products, and more.http://xml.sandn.neten-gbCopyright (c) British Data Archive3article.php?id=3Naval ServiceNavy Lists contains additional information beyond naval officers and the dates of their seniority, which takes the careers of some back into the late eighteenth century.
Navy Lists contains additional information beyond naval officers and the dates of their seniority, which takes the careers of some back into the late eighteenth century. This information includes personnel working in the Civil Department of the navy. the dockyards and medals awarded to ships and individuals back to 1793, which covers the period of the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars and the great sea battles of the early nineteenth century. The medals both with and without officers in their ancestry. Rates of pay for all naval personnel, both serving and retired, are given. This product is available from S&N Genealogy Supplies.
1 Dec 2006http://www.armylists.org.uk/
14article.php?id=14The Manless Homes of EnglandAcknowledging the void left in England after numerous men went to fight in World War I, and the changes in the lives of women.
The War Illustrated magazine was a 'weekly picture-record of events by land, sea and air' of the First World War, from 22 August 1914 to 8 February 1919. 'The manless homes of England' article,(Volume 3, number 65, The War Illustrated, 13 November 1915) acknowledges the void left in England after numerous men went to fight in World War I. Cicely Hamilton (right) discusses the effects of this great rediction in manpower and the changes in the lives of the women, who had to work to fill the gap in society. An example of this is given in the changes in teaching. Not only did women become teachers, but books and newspapers were written for women. These were just two of the repercussions of the war. Also mentioned was the expected rise in women who worked to earn their living and, with that, the expected increase in female influence over industry.
17 Jan 2007http://www.armylists.org.uk
9article.php?id=9'The War Illustrated' - Product Review by Sean BradyThe original magazine was a 'weekly picture-record of events by land, sea and air' of the First World War.
"Reviewing this CD on the eve of my visit to Ypres/lepers is coincidently appropriate. The nine CDs in the S&N Genealogy publication contain the 233 digitally enhanced and indexed issues of The War Illustrated. The original magazine was a 'weekly picture-record of events by land, sea and air' of the First World War, from 22 August 1914 to 8 February 1919. It is unashamedly patriotic, but when you're fighting a war, that's to be expected. Notwithstanding the propaganda, the magazine contains an amazing history of the period, an introduction by HG Wells and plenty of illustrations and photographs. The cover price was 2d which enabled most working-class families to read it, and many did. I can remember seeing copies for sale in second-hand bookshops in the 1950s. Now I wish I's bought some of the magazines so I'm delighted to be able to see the complete collection in digital format." - Sean Brady
1 Jan 2007http://www.armylists.org.uk
45article.php?id=45Case Study: Lawrence OatesLawrence Edward Grace Oates saw military service during the Second Boer War, as an officer in the dragoons. He can be found the the 1900 Army List.
Lawrence Edward Grace Oates was born in Putney in 1880, and educated at Eton College. He saw military service during the Second Boer War, as an officer in the dragoons. He went down in history for his famous last words, "I am just going outside and may be some time." In 1910, he applied to join an expedition to the South Pole, and was accepted on the strength of his experience with horses and his ability to make a financial contribution to the expedition. On the way back from the pole in March 1912, the party faced very difficult conditions. After the loss of one man, Oates became severely frostbitten and weakened more quickly than the others. His slower progress coupled with the unwillingness of his three remaining companions to leave him behind caused the party to fall behind schedule. Eventually Oates, recognising the need to sacrifice himself in order to give the others a chance of survival, left the tent to die in the blizzard, saying: "I am just going outside and may be some time". However, it was too late, and the remaining men perished eleven miles short of their food depot. Oates's body has never been found. When he was serving in the army, he was very likely to have been listed in an Army List. After checking the Army List for 1900, he was found on the 'Index to Officers on the Active List'.
12 Mar 2007http://www.armylists.org.uk/