http://xml.sandn.net/images/feedlogo.JPGGenealogy News, Information and Updateshttp://xml.sandn.netGenealogy News, Information and UpdatesRegularly updated genealogy information in the UK. Includes general information and news, information about online information, updates from family history websites, reviews of genealogy products, and more.http://xml.sandn.neten-gbCopyright (c) British Data Archive42article.php?id=42Case Study - Charles DarwinCharles Darwin was an English naturalist who achieved lasting fame by producing considerable evidence that the species came about through evolutionary change.
Charles Robert Darwin was an English naturalist who achieved lasting fame by producing considerable evidence that species originated through evolutionary change, at the same time proposing the scientific theory that natural selection is the mechanism by which such change occurs. Darwin developed an interest in natural history while studying first medicine, then theology, at university. His 1859 book On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection (usually abbreviated to The Origin of Species) established evolution by common descent, which means that all organisms on Earth are descended from a common ancestor or gene pool. In recognition of Darwin's pre-eminence, he was buried in Westminsted Abbey, close to John Herschel and Isaac Newton. "I began by doing a BMD Image Search in Death Records, using the BMDindex.co.uk website. I knew Darwin died in Bromley in 1882, so I set the year to 1882. I then typed in his forename and surname, and clicked search. However, I did not know which month he died in, so searched through the images until I found him. I found him in the April - June death records (below), and a closer look reveals the volume number and volume page number which can be used for ordering certificates (below). After researching Charles Darwin, I found that he died on April 19th, so I am certain that this is the correct death record."
12 Mar 2007http://www.ukburials.com/
40article.php?id=40Case Study - Sir Frank WhittleSir Frank Whittle (1907 - 1996) was a Royal Air Force officer who invented the Jet engine. This is how his birth record was found.
Sir Frank Whittle (1907 - 1996) was a Royal Air Force officer who invented the Jet engine. He was only 21 when he first mentioned the idea of turbo-jet propulsion to his employers, the Air Ministry. He patented the idea in 1930, but had to let the patent drop as he did not have sufficient funds for its renewal. In 1934 he arrived in Cambridge and completed his degree in only two years, gaining a first. During his time at Cambridge he was still engrossed in his idea of jet travel. He was immensely encouraged by his tutor at Cambridge and by Melvill Jones the Head of Aeronautical Engineering. Fortunately, as his time at Cambridge was coming to an end, three of his colleagues, retired RAF pilots, suggested setting up a development company. Thus Power Jets was formed. "Finding Frank Whittle's birth record was simple. I began by doing a BMD Image Search in Birth Records, using TheGenealogist.co.uk website. I knew Whittle was born in Coventry in 1907, so I set the year range to 1907. I then typed in his forename and surname, and clicked search. However, I did not know which month he was born in, so searched through the images until I found him. I found him in the April - June birth records, and a closer look reveals that he was born in Coventry, and the volume number and volume page number are given which can be used for ordering a certificate."
12 Mar 2007http://www.ukbaptisms.co.uk/
1article.php?id=1London AncestorsAs anyone with ancestors in the London area knows, research there can be a nightmare. There are different records offices for the City of London, Westminster, and Greater London. So what's the best way to do your research?
As anyone with ancestors in the London area knows, research there can be a nightmare. There are different records offices for the City of London, Westminster, Greater London, parishes in the pre-1888 counties of Surrey and Kent, as well as a multitude of local history libraries. If a family moved only a few streets, it can mean decamping from one repository to another to track them. This is time-consuming enough for Londoners but for those elsewhere the time and travel expenses are multiplied. Two of S&N's publications go some way to overcoming the obstacles for those working on the mid-nineteenth century, when people were flooding into London from all over the country. The London 1852 Directory can help to pinpoint where an ancestor lived because it would have been compiled in the census year. The set of two CD-ROMs making up the London 1851 Census should locate him or her in this important census, the first to require place of birth. The 31 discs include a street index. The whole of the 1851 census for London, digitised from microfiche and supplemented where necessary from the original books, is included. As there is no complete index, S&N are encouraging people to help produce one by including an Excel spreadsheet in this pack and showing which areas have been already done on their website. S&N also have a CD-ROM containing the 1851 index at its current state, which can be accessed for the same price at TheGenealogist. Some areas have been indexed and are available from the volunteers that created them, usually local family history societies. Even if your ancestors were not skilled enough to be included in the Directory or you don't know exactly which street they lived in, clicking through a district of the census at home is certainly preferable to traveling to the FRC to use the microfilms. It will also probably be cheaper than making several trips to London if you live outside.
24 Nov 2006http://www.genealogysupplies.com/
6article.php?id=6Women allowed to enter the Medical Profession from 1876In the 19th Century, a career as a physician was a highly respected following for a man. Yet it was considered outrageous for any woman to pursue a career in that profession.
In the 19th Century, a career as a physician was a highly respected following for a man. Yet it was considered outrageous for any woman to pursue a career in such a traditionally male-dominated profession. Despite this, some women were determined to succeed. Born in 1836, Elizabeth Garrett Anderson wanted to become a doctor from an early age, but still met with great resistance when applying to medical institutions, all of which denied her entry. She was finally permitted to attend Middlesex Hospital as a nursing student, but was deeply unpopular, particularly after an incident in which she was shown to be the only student able to answer the lecturer's questions. As a result she was barred from attending by other students. In 1865 she took and passed the Society of Apothecaries' exam, as the regulations didn't state that women couldn't sit it. Immediately afterwards, the society changed its rules to forbid women from taking the exam - a discouraging example of the mindset she was up against. Still determined to become a doctor, she travelled to France where she finally gained her degree from the University of Paris. She married in 1871 and combined having children with her ongoing career - founding the New Hospital for Women in London, and subsequently the London School of Medicine for Women. In 1876 a government Act declared that all women should be allowed to enter the medical professions - an Act almost certainly influenced by her achievements. Elizabeth Garrett Anderson can be found in the 1851 Census for Suffolk.
16 Dec 2006http://www.genealogysupplies.co.uk