http://xml.sandn.net/images/feedlogo.JPGGenealogy News, Information and Updateshttp://xml.sandn.netGenealogy News, Information and UpdatesRegularly updated genealogy information in the UK. Includes general information and news, information about online information, updates from family history websites, reviews of genealogy products, and more.http://xml.sandn.neten-gbCopyright (c) British Data Archive5article.php?id=5Knebworth House, the 'stately home of rock' in the 1851 CensusThe 1851 Census includes the records for Knebworth House, the 'stately home of rock', which has welcomed acts such as Pink Floyd, The Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin and Queen.
The 1851 Census for Hitchin, Hertfordshire (HO107/1709-1710) includes the records for Knebworth House, the 'stately home of rock', which has welcomed acts such as Pink Floyd, The Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin and Queen. The Lytton family have owned Knebworth House, which began life as a red brick tudor manor house, since 1490. The house was greatly altered by its most famous resident, Edward Bulwer-Lytton, who added a heavy gothic element to the building. Edward, who because an MP in 1831, was also a popular writer of his day, publishing novels such as Pelham, Godolphin, and The Last Days of Pompeii. He also had a talent for coining a memorable phrase, notably 'the pen is mightier than the sword' and 'in pursuit of the almighty dollar'. Edward succeeded to Knebworth in 1843, and often invited illustrious friends from literary and parliamentary circles to stay there, including Charles Dickens. If you take a look at the 1851 Census for Hertfordshire, you can find E Bulwer Lytton listed as a baronet and proprietor of land employing 25 labourers. (HO107/1709, folio 302). Census sets are available on CD from British Data Archive.
13 Dec 2006http://www.britishdataarchive.com
37article.php?id=37Possible Pitfalls in Using the CensusMany people don't realise that the census page images we see are actually transcripts of the household census forms, the details were copied into the books by the enumerators.
Many people don't realise that the census page images we see are actually transcripts of the household census forms, the details were copied into the books by the enumerators. This provides several opportunities for mistakes to occur, firstly as they tried to decipher the writing on the household forms, which were later destroyed. Illiterate or barely literate ancestors may not have understood the form or even know with any accuracy the answer to the questions. They may have been suspicious of this government prying into their affairs and been less than honest in their answers. Just as today, a certain percentage manage to avoid being included, either deliberately or accidentally. With the possibility of errors and misinformation creeping in from the very outset, you should always use your own judgment when assessing the information from the census, it may be completely accurate, but you will often find discrepancies.
10 Mar 2007http://www.londoncensus.co.uk/
42article.php?id=42Case Study - Charles DarwinCharles Darwin was an English naturalist who achieved lasting fame by producing considerable evidence that the species came about through evolutionary change.
Charles Robert Darwin was an English naturalist who achieved lasting fame by producing considerable evidence that species originated through evolutionary change, at the same time proposing the scientific theory that natural selection is the mechanism by which such change occurs. Darwin developed an interest in natural history while studying first medicine, then theology, at university. His 1859 book On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection (usually abbreviated to The Origin of Species) established evolution by common descent, which means that all organisms on Earth are descended from a common ancestor or gene pool. In recognition of Darwin's pre-eminence, he was buried in Westminsted Abbey, close to John Herschel and Isaac Newton. "I began by doing a BMD Image Search in Death Records, using the BMDindex.co.uk website. I knew Darwin died in Bromley in 1882, so I set the year to 1882. I then typed in his forename and surname, and clicked search. However, I did not know which month he died in, so searched through the images until I found him. I found him in the April - June death records (below), and a closer look reveals the volume number and volume page number which can be used for ordering certificates (below). After researching Charles Darwin, I found that he died on April 19th, so I am certain that this is the correct death record."
12 Mar 2007http://www.ukburials.com/
44article.php?id=44The Bronte Sisters in the Yorkshire 1841 CensusThe three Bronte sisters - Charlotte, Emily and Anne - grew up with their brother Branwell in Parsonage House in Haworth, Yorkshire. They can be found in the 1841 Census.
The three Bronte sisters - Charlotte, Emily and Anne - grew up with their brother Branwell in Parsonage House in Haworth, Yorkshire. Their childhood was blighted by the deaths of their mother from cancer, and their elder sisters, Maria and Elizabeth, from tuberculosis. Their father Reverend Patrick Bronte was understandably a somewhat melancholy character, and the children depended on writing stories to entertain themselves. Creating sophisticated sagas about imaginary countries and kingdoms, they developed literary skills which they took with them into adulthood. Parsonage House - The home of the Brontes Parsonage House famously stands within an area of expansive moorland, which they were allowed to roam on as children, and which would have given their imaginations free rein. The harsh landscape formed the inspiration for the windswept, treacherous moors immortalised in Emily's most famous work, Wuthering Heights. All three worked occasionally as governesses, and in 1841 we can see that Charlotte is working away in this capacity whilst Emily and Anne remain at home. They all disliked the job, and Charlotte and Anne both wrote novels (Jane Eyre and Agnes Grey) which describe its perils, and the general pressures on women of their social standing during this period. They could marry, find work as a governess or servant, or remain with their families- but couldn't easily achieve a meaningful independence. Their writing allowed them to explore and document this situation. Ironically, due to the restrictions of the time, their poetry and novels were published under the male pseudonyms of Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell - three brothers rather than sisters. Their works are very different, but share common strengths of innovation and vision, particularly Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights, which both received a decidedly lukewarm reception on their initial publication, but are now hailed as classics. All three are to be found on the 1841 census, but Emily died of tuberculosis in 1848 and Anne of an unknown illness a year later, and only Charlotte appears, back in Haworth, in 1851. She died in 1855, having revealed her true identity as the author of Jane Eyre only a few years previously. With that information in hand, I set out to look for their census records in the Yorkshire 1841 & 1851 Census CD sets purchased from British Data Archive. I looked up Charlotte Bronte on www.TheGenealogist.co.uk by doing a search under the 1841 Yorkshire census transcripts, and immediately found her. I decided to view an image of the census record and found her to be living at Upper Road House. The search results informed me that I could also find this record on the CD set (CD 28, HO107 / 1313 / 7, folio 13). After my success with Charlotte, I decided to tackle the other two sisters, Emily and Anne. I searched for Emily first, again on www.TheGenealogist.co.uk, loaded up the census image, and found her living at Parsonage House with her sister Anne and their father Patrick. The search results showed me that I could also find this record on the CD set (CD21, HO107/1295/6/, Folio 41).
12 Mar 2007http://www.yorkshirecensus.co.uk