http://xml.sandn.net/images/feedlogo.JPGGenealogy News, Information and Updateshttp://xml.sandn.netGenealogy News, Information and UpdatesRegularly updated genealogy information in the UK. Includes general information and news, information about online information, updates from family history websites, reviews of genealogy products, and more.http://xml.sandn.neten-gbCopyright (c) British Data Archive89article.php?id=89Article of the Month: The Ultimate SacrificeWe all owe a debt of gratitude to those who died fighting for our country, and November 11th is the time when we remember those who died in the Great War of 1914 to 1918, the 'War to end all wars'.
We all owe a debt of gratitude to those who died fighting for our country, and November 11th is the time when we remember those who died in the Great War of 1914 to 1918, the 'War to end all wars'. It was the largest conflict in history and involved 70 million people from different countries, backgrounds, religions and race. Just about every family was affected by this war, including the famous Charles Darwin, whose grandson Erasmus Darwin was killed in the second battle of Ypres. Searching in the Roll of Honour on TheGenealogist.co.uk gives three results for Erasmus. The first is an official GRO death entry, which provides a reference number to order his death certificate, and also a link to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website, which then provides details of where he is buried. The second entry comes from De Ruvigny’s Roll of Honour, which contains 25,000 records, 7000 of which also have a portrait photograph. Erasmus’s death on 24th April 1915 is recorded along with his rank, regiment, photograph and profile. The profile section is a biography often provided by family and friends and is intended as a tribute and memorial. The third entry for Erasmus is from the Bond of Sacrifice records, which covers officers who fell during the war, and also gives details of rank, regiment, date of death and a short profile. The National Roll of the Great War is a tribute to the men, and also women, who survived and died in the First World War. It has 14 volumes in total, and given that it is only a selection of the people involved, it just demonstrates how many lives were affected by the tragic events of 1914 to 1918. You can view The National Roll of the Great War on TheGenealogist.co.uk in the ‘Roll of Honour’ section, along with the British Roll of Honour which remembers officers who fell during the war. Entries can include a biography of the officer, information on the circumstances of the death, their education and immediate family that were left behind. Some of these can include a portrait photograph. Also available is the Chatham, Plymouth and Portsmouth Memorial Register, which remembers both officers and men of the Royal Navy who died at sea, with their rank and place of service, details of immediate family and date/circumstances of death. When we think of war records we immediately think of those who fought and died, but the new RG32 records now available on TheGenealogist.co.uk also contain births of British citizens in France and other countries across the world during the first and also Second World War. The RG32 records are part of the exclusive BMD Registers collection, and can be found in the non-conformist section. These records contain Births, Baptisms, Marriages, Deaths and Burials abroad, and on British as well as foreign ships, of British subjects. It also includes certificates issued by foreign registration authorities and documents sent by individuals to the Registrar General. For the Second World War period it includes some notifications of deaths of members of the services, prisoners of war, civilians, internees and deaths through aircraft lost in flight, as well as births and marriages that took place around the world. The internet has now opened up a whole world of records that were previously hidden away in archives, and although the original record itself is important, being able to see the information they provide in the comfort of your own home is of enormous use, and will keep the message alive that the mistakes of the past should not be repeated, and the tremendous bravery of our ancestors should never be not forgotten. So as we remember the 15 million people who gave their lives for us in the First World War, remember also the soldiers still alive in the UK today who have fought for us and who still continue to fight for us. The Royal British Legion provides financial, social and emotional support to millions who have served or are currently serving in the Armed Forces, and their dependants. Please make a donation to their cause at www.poppy.org.uk and wear your poppy with pride.
04 Dec 2009http://www.thegenealogist.co.uk
85article.php?id=85RootsMagic 4 Software ReviewVersion 4 of this popular family history package was released in late March. For the latest review, go to To read the full review go to www.genealogyreviews.co.uk/yftMay09_RM4.htm.
RootsMagic 4: One of the best family history programs out there. We featured RootsMagic 1 in the very first edition of YFT back in 2003 and concluded it was an excellent program for recording your family history. Six years later, version 4 confirms the program's reputation for only having major releases when significant new capabilities have been added, and not just because the calendar has flipped to a new year. In fact, the list of improvements for RM4 looked so good we were keen to see if it could match our expectations. To read the full review go to www.genealogyreviews.co.uk/yftMay09_RM4.htm
03 Jul 2009http://www.genealogyreviews.co.uk
84article.php?id=84Website solves mystery of ancestor missing for decadesJohn Titford finds the marriage of a ancestor he had been looking for for over twenty years.
I had been looking for the marriage of a ancestor of mine for over twenty years. Thomas Hasted, a cloth scourer of Fenchurch Street and a freeman of the Clothworkers' Company, would have married a lady with the first name of Mary some time in the late 1730s. I must say that I had always thought that he must have gone in for a Fleet wedding, but I lacked both the courage and the time to wade through the voluminous original registers at the National Archives. Yet there he was on the new web-site, identifiable in a flash: Thomas Hasted, bachelor, `scourer' of St Catherine Cree Church (in Leadenhall Street) and Mary Stevenson. spinster, were married at the `Shepherd and Goat' on Fleet Ditch by John Gaynham, the so-called `Bishop of Hell', who entered the details in his grubby little notebook. The marriage took place in 1737. Now Thomas Hasted had begun an apprenticeship in 1733, and apprentices were not allowed to marry during their term. Thomas was not made free of the Clothworkers' Company until 1740, and - like many others with something to hide - he had married secretly, no questions asked, during his apprenticeship. Success, then, after twenty years of fruitless searching. - John Titford The above is an extract from the letters page of Family Tree Magazine Fleet marriages are just one of the unique sets of BMD records going back the the 17th century available on www.TheGenealogist.co.uk and www.BMDRegsiters.co.uk.
19 Jun 2009http://www.bmdregisters.co.uk
83article.php?id=83NEW RELEASE: RootsMagic UK Version 4"RootsMagic v4 is bristling with new features, major and minor, matching or exceeding its mainstream competition. Its versatile reporting and publishing are better than many."
RootsMagic 4 is the premier genealogy software. Available exclusively from S&N, there are three UK editions, to suit every pocket. Created specifically for the UK by Bruce Buzbee, RootsMagic UK edition is powerful, yet easy-to-use, genealogy software. Its intuitive interface lets you publish your family history in a variety of ways: as charts, reports, books and even online. "RootsMagic v4 is bristling with new features, major and minor, matching or exceeding its mainstream competition. Its versatile reporting and publishing are better than many. RootsMagic To-Go is a milestone in portability." - Recommended, IT Reviews May 09
19 Jun 2009http://www.rootsmagic.co.uk
80article.php?id=80Fleet RegistersBefore 1754 many marriages were not performed in parish churces due to the need for people to get around the need for banns and other petty regulations. The favourite alternative venue was the Fleet Prison.
Before 1754 many marriages were not performed in parish churces due to the need for people to get around the need for banns and other petty regulations. The favourite alternative venue was the Fleet Prison which was outside the jurisdiction of the Church of England. It is though that around 230,000 marriages were celebrated thre by the 1740's before legislation was tightened up by Hardwicke's Marriage Act 1754 (which said that weddings had to take place in an Anglican church). Fleet marriages were heavily frowned upon by the Church, though were valid in law. The practice was banned with the introduction of Hardwicke's Act 1754, which required a license to be granted or banns to be called, although some ministers did continue to practice them illegally for a time. The Fleet Registers collection held at the National Archives (called RG7) has now been made available by S&N Genealogy Supplies on their websites www.bmdregisters.co.uk and www.thegenealogist.co.uk.
08 Apr 2009http://www.thegenealogist.co.uk
49article.php?id=49Celebrities of the Army - Colonel R.S.S. Baden-PowellA short extract from 'Celebrities of the Army', a book written in the 19th Century.
The following is an extract from "Celebrities of the Army", published by S&N Genealogy Supplies. "The war in South Africa has made and consolidated several notable reputations, but, perhaps, no single officer will have come out of it with greater accession of both popularity and professional esteem than the gallant cavalryman who is commonly know as "B.P". A few years ago Baden-Powell was chiefly known as a smart and resourceful Hussar, who had done good work in Zululand in 1888, and was a recognised authority on polo, pig-sticking, and sport generally. The son of a well-known Oxford professor, he had entered the 13th Hussars at the age of 19 in 1876, had been adjutant of his regiment, A.D.C at the Cape, and Assistant Military Secretary at Malta, and had won the Kadir Cup "after pig" at Cawnpore. But he did not come to the front as a campaigner until the Ashanti Expedition of 1896, when he was employed on special duty in charge of native levies, and, incidentally, by the Daily Chronicle as a Correspondant. His letters to the latter were afterwards expanded into a volume entitled "The Downfall of Prempeh", which proved him to possess considerable literary and descriptive power. Indeed his intellectual capacity, apart from soldiering, is very marked, and in singing, painting, and amateur acting, as well as in literature, this versatile sabreur takes keen pleasure when not engaged in the sterner pursuit of hunting men." You can find more about this product at www.genealogysupplies.com.
12 Mar 2007http://www.armylists.org.uk
48article.php?id=48Regimental Standards and Cap BadgesWithin the regimental system, soldiers and officers are posted to a tactical unit of their own regiment whenever posted to field duty.
Within the regimental system, soldiers and officers are posted to a tactical unit of their own regiment whenever posted to field duty. A regiment is likely to include: - a symbolic colonel-in-chief (often a member of the royal family), - a Colonel of the Regiment or "honorary colonel" who protects the traditions and interests of the regimental family and insists on the maintenance of high standards, - battle honours (honours earned by one unit of an administrative regiment are shared by the whole regiment), - ceremonial uniforms, - cap badges, - and regimental marches and songs. More information about regimental standards and cap badges can be found at ArmyLists.org.uk
12 Mar 2007http://www.armylists.org.uk
47article.php?id=47Military Head DressHeadwear is one of the defining items of military clothing. The colour signifies which part of the army a soldier belongs to, and the headwear carries the Corps or Regimental badge.
Headwear is one of the defining items of military clothing. The colour signifies which part of the army a soldier belongs to, and the headwear carries the Corps or Regimental badge. Military Head Dress includes, but is not limited to: Busby - a military head-dress made of fur, worn by Hungarian hussars. Shako - a tall, cylindrical military cap, usually peaked, sometimes tapered at the top. It is usually adorned with some kind of ornamental plate or badge on the front, metallic or otherwise, and often has a feather, plume, or pompon attached at the top. Bearskins - a tall fur cap worn as part of the ceremonial uniform of several regiments in the British Army (most notably the five regiments of Foot Guards). More information about military head dress available from ArmyLists.org.uk.
12 Mar 2007http://www.armylists.org.uk
46article.php?id=46Tracing a Military AncestorRecords of army officers were kept as early as 1702. So if you are searching for a particluar army list you know has some vital information that you need for your research, there are many products to choose from.
Records of army officers were kept as early as 1702. These lists named the officer, their regiment, and usually the date they received their current commission and when they retired. The first official Army list was published in 1740 and since 1754 they have been published regularly as annual lists (1754-1879) and quarterly lists (1879-1922). Since 1939 they have been classified and not available to the public. An outline of an officer's career is usually fairly easy to discover from official army lists. The most important information is usually organised by regiment, so if you need to trace a military ancestor, you aren't going to get very far without their regiment details. An army list can give you much more detail, and can usually provide the key to accessing a soldier's various documents relating to their appointment and service. (These documents can then be accessed via the Public Record Office). If you are searching for a particular army list you know has some vital information that need for your research, there are many products that you can choose from. S&N Genealogy Supplies has a large range of military records.
12 Mar 2007http://www.genealogysupplies.com/
45article.php?id=45Case Study: Lawrence OatesLawrence Edward Grace Oates saw military service during the Second Boer War, as an officer in the dragoons. He can be found the the 1900 Army List.
Lawrence Edward Grace Oates was born in Putney in 1880, and educated at Eton College. He saw military service during the Second Boer War, as an officer in the dragoons. He went down in history for his famous last words, "I am just going outside and may be some time." In 1910, he applied to join an expedition to the South Pole, and was accepted on the strength of his experience with horses and his ability to make a financial contribution to the expedition. On the way back from the pole in March 1912, the party faced very difficult conditions. After the loss of one man, Oates became severely frostbitten and weakened more quickly than the others. His slower progress coupled with the unwillingness of his three remaining companions to leave him behind caused the party to fall behind schedule. Eventually Oates, recognising the need to sacrifice himself in order to give the others a chance of survival, left the tent to die in the blizzard, saying: "I am just going outside and may be some time". However, it was too late, and the remaining men perished eleven miles short of their food depot. Oates's body has never been found. When he was serving in the army, he was very likely to have been listed in an Army List. After checking the Army List for 1900, he was found on the 'Index to Officers on the Active List'.
12 Mar 2007http://www.armylists.org.uk/